Camping Is Its Own Basal

I’m not a doctor.

During our camping adventure in Sequoia this weekend, I knew there would be an abnormally high amount of physical activity. Between walking everywhere, and walking everywhere, I knew insulin adjustments would be necessary to avoid as many lows as possible.

Precautions were certainly taken: I bought gatorade mix to stock my water bottle every morning, we bought some tasty granola bars, and picked up some trail mix to top things off. And Dayle and I ensured all of our diabetes devices were sufficiently charged before going off the grid. But even with all of that preparation, lows can still happen.

I suppose there are worse places to stop and take a snack break though. I mean…  Continue reading

Just Talking with Parris Lilly

Parris Lilly returns to discuss Heartbleed, Game of Thrones, the summer movie season, and most importantly to help me build an exercise routine for the Spring and Summer months. Parris has gone through a number of significant lifestyle changes and I’m hoping I, and you, can come away with some useful tips by the time our hour is up. Enjoy!

You can follow Parris on Twitter @vicious696 and learn more about his spring fitness exploits on Facebook.

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A Walk to Baker Beach

I can’t envision a scenario where a 2-mile walk to the beach would ever seem like a bad idea, but when this is the reward, it’s unbelievably difficult to turn down.

As I’ve said, and will likely continue to say, city life is the ultimate basal insulin. Getting to take in sights, and sites, like this while positively contributing to my health and diabetes management might be the most underrated piece of my move to the west coast.

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A Bit of Fit

Hello there. #fitbit

A photo posted by Christopher Snider (@iam_spartacus) on

The theory I’m operating on is that seeing and feeling this thing on my wrist every day will provide the external motivation I need to take my health more seriously. I’m not going to run a marathon tomorrow, but I’m hoping this will be a sufficient reminder that I need to get off the couch more.

Ironically, I should already be in tune to the fact that a healthy lifestyle requires more than simply acknowledging that exercise is good. I wear a Dexcom sensor on my arm for weeks on end. I take insulin injections for meals and basal coverage. I’m testing my blood glucose by poking my fingers all the time. Diabetes is an ever-present reminder that being healthy requires active participation and constant engagement. There are no days off with diabetes.

Among my problems right now is the fact that there has not been a documented detriment to my A1c. I want to believe that if things got out of hand with that one number, I’d find a way to turn the page and get back on the path to a better me. But I don’t want to wait for things to get that bad. This is my attempt find my way before I reach an ultimatum.

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Imagine a World

I dreamt of a world where I went to the gym every morning during the week, targeting different muscle groups for a well-rounded approach to physical fitness. Every evening I spent an episode of Breaking Bad on the elliptical machine or searching for zen with a yoga session. In this world, I kept better track of my physical activity and ate responsibly.

I checked my blood glucose at least 6 times a day. I took my insulin Lantus at 11pm and 11am every day. I took my Humalog at least 15 minutes before eating. I took my Synthroid and Lisinopril every day.

I dreamt of a world where I was in complete control.

Then I woke up and realized that world doesn’t exist.

But I can try to make that dream a reality.

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Upsetting the Balance

I think, generally speaking, we all know what has to be done to live a healthy life. Some level of exercise, a balanced diet, and an intangible quality of life factor loosely represent the tripod that makes our individual worlds go ’round. Obviously each one of those components is influenced by a wide range of factors, thus making each of our lives unique and blah blah blah. And while it’s a given that all of this isn’t easy, diabetes makes everything more complicated in ways that I cannot describe – but I’ll try anyway.

Let’s take today for example:

Not bad. Not great, but not bad.

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