Just Talking About Blood Glucose Meter Satisfaction

This week I spoke with Rick Johnson, Director of Healthcare Practice at JD Power and Associates about the recently released Blood Glucose Meter Satisfaction Survey. We also discussed the mechanics behind the survey, conclusions, and the general state of diabetes technology. Enjoy.

More information about the Blood Glucose Meter Satisfaction Survey can be found at jdpower.com.

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The Me Too Conundrum

Image (linked) captured from My Diabetes Secret

Image (linked) captured from My Diabetes Secret

Finding someone who gets it is great. You don’t have to explain the basics. You don’t have to explain the details. Jargon and slang become the common language. It’s like being part of a secret society that happens to affect more than 29 million (diagnosed and undiagnosed, regardless of type) people.

But in order for them to “get it”, they have to go through the same struggles you do. They have to experience the fear, dread, anger, sadness, frustration, confusion, and maybe even depression. In order for them to get it, they have to have it. And that sucks.

I’m a firm believer in the power of “me too”, I just wish it didn’t come at such a cost.

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The One Where The Diabetes Community Crashed The FDA

Unfortunate? Ironic? Awesome? All of the above?

Unfortunate? Ironic? Awesome? All of the above?

I think the biggest sign that you’re on the right track in engaging a community in a collaborative discussion is when that community shows up in numbers so overwhelming, your livestream crashes and (apparently) cripples the entire FDA network.

Or as Jenny McCue of HCMStrategies put it,

If you live with diabetes, know someone who does, or even if you’ve seen a movie with someone who has diabetes in it, then you know the disease sneaks up on you. It hits you when you want it the least. Outside of the amazing response our community showed, having the FDA system crash and have to keep going is one of the most persuasive testaments we could have delivered.

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Your Diabetes Advocacy May Vary

It is reasonable to believe Diabetes Awareness is bigger than a diabetes awareness “month”, right? Living this disease day in and day out for over 12 years speaks more than an arbitrary allotment in a calendar. Sometimes speaking with one collective voice makes a difference (like ‪#‎DOCasksFDA‬), but individual stories, whenever and wherever they are told are just as impactful.

Also, your diabetes (advocacy) may vary.

To that end, please read Dayle’s post about her perspective on Diabetes Awareness Month. It’s pretty great.

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Fill Out This Survey to Tell The FDA What Matters To You

Last night I was chatting with someone after class at Stanford (excuse me while I pick that name up off the floor) about my perception of the FDA and realized we’ve come a long way. In particular, I recalled seeing Bennett Dunlap literally sitting at the table with the FDA, talking about the accuracy of our blood glucose meters. I can’t speak for other disease communities, but seeing one of “us” there with one of “them” is something I never would have anticipated five years ago.

An organization like the FDA has to move slow. The health of the country is in their hands. When it comes to reviews, recalls, reports, and other ‘r’ words, they have to take their time to ensure they’ve done their due diligence to get things right. That approach is what makes the conversation Bennett had all the more important. An entity as massive as the FDA doesn’t pivot in an instant. They don’t turn on a dime. Change is a slow, gradual process over there. That’s why it’s important for us to applaud, encourage, and continue to support efforts that recognize and include patient communities in their processes.

Every time they look to “us”, the patient community, we have to be ready to support the mere fact that they are including us in the conversation. Feedback on open dockets, like blood glucose meter accuracy offer an excellent opportunity to say “thank you for giving us an opportunity to share what we think, let’s do this again, as often as possible.”, or something like that.

My point is, when the FDA looks to the patient community for feedback, we have to speak up. We have to speak up not only for ourselves, our loved ones, and each other – we have to speak up for other disease communities who deserve a chance to be part of the discussion. We have to speak up to reinforce that this type of action is most welcome, and should be pursued as often as possible.

To that end, here’s your next opportunity to speak up. You can go to diatribe.org/survey and help inform the FDA on what matters most to youContinue reading